Wednesday, December 1, 2010

The Origin of Christmas

I love stories about origins. Where do common phrases come from? How did popular traditions arise? All that stuff is of interest to me. So ... do you know the origin of Christmas? I know, I know, you're quite sure it's of pagan origin. Lots of people will tell you that. I would suggest otherwise.
... in hope of eternal life, which God, who never lies, promised before the ages began and at the proper time manifested in his word through the preaching with which I have been entrusted by the command of God our Savior (Titus 1:2-3).
Paul, writing to Titus, makes this dazzling claim. According to Paul, God promised "before the ages began" salvation for sinful Man. (Who He promised is interesting, but not the point here.)

There is often a sense among Christians that God's plan of salvation was "Plan B". What He really wanted was a perfect race of humans, but Adam messed up God's plan, so He had to come up with an alternative to try to salvage this whole mess. Paul disagrees. Before time ("ages") began, God planned a Savior -- His Son. Adam didn't mess up God's plan; he fulfilled it. Christ wasn't "Plan B"; He was the original intention.

Where does Christmas come from? Well, we can argue over various origins of various traditions, dates, components, whatever you wish, but the whole notion of "Joy to the world! The Lord has come" was God's idea from the beginning. We are not celebrating "Plan B". The birth of our Savior was not an alternative plan. We are celebrating God's successful plan laid down before time began and carried out to perfection.
Hark! the herald angels sing
Glory to the newborn King!
Peace on earth and mercy mild,
God and sinners reconciled!
Joyful, all ye nations, rise,
Join the triumph of the skies;
With th' angelic host proclaim
Christ is born in Bethlehem!
Hark! the herald angels sing
Glory to the new-born King!
Whatever you believe about December 25th, its traditions, or its current condition, that is something to celebrate.
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The Origin of Christmas

I love stories about origins. Where do common phrases come from? How did popular traditions arise? All that stuff is of interest to me. So ... do you know the origin of Christmas? I know, I know, you're quite sure it's of pagan origin. Lots of people will tell you that. I would suggest otherwise.
... in hope of eternal life, which God, who never lies, promised before the ages began and at the proper time manifested in his word through the preaching with which I have been entrusted by the command of God our Savior (Titus 1:2-3).
Paul, writing to Titus, makes this dazzling claim. According to Paul, God promised "before the ages began" salvation for sinful Man. (Who He promised is interesting, but not the point here.)

There is often a sense among Christians that God's plan of salvation was "Plan B". What He really wanted was a perfect race of humans, but Adam messed up God's plan, so He had to come up with an alternative to try to salvage this whole mess. Paul disagrees. Before time ("ages") began, God planned a Savior -- His Son. Adam didn't mess up God's plan; he fulfilled it. Christ wasn't "Plan B"; He was the original intention.

Where does Christmas come from? Well, we can argue over various origins of various traditions, dates, components, whatever you wish, but the whole notion of "Joy to the world! The Lord has come" was God's idea from the beginning. We are not celebrating "Plan B". The birth of our Savior was not an alternative plan. We are celebrating God's successful plan laid down before time began and carried out to perfection.
Hark! the herald angels sing
Glory to the newborn King!
Peace on earth and mercy mild,
God and sinners reconciled!
Joyful, all ye nations, rise,
Join the triumph of the skies;
With th' angelic host proclaim
Christ is born in Bethlehem!
Hark! the herald angels sing
Glory to the new-born King!
Whatever you believe about December 25th, its traditions, or its current condition, that is something to celebrate.
Post a Comment